Posts by JessieRymph

Jessie is Success Content Specialist at Salesforce.org. All opinions expressed on this blog are her own or those of the contributors. For twelve years, she has specialized in CRM, email marketing and fundraising platforms. Jessie co-led the Seattle Salesforce Non-Profit User Group in 2015-2016. She's working on writing her first novel.

Flow Basics for Nonprofit Admins

Jessie speaking at Dreamforce

That’s me living my dream while the audience listens on headphones.

Learning how to build a Flow is like interacting with a volunteer who…needs some extra help. Through these videos, I explain some of the trickier flow concepts for admins: “get records” and “record variables.” I was lucky enough to give his presentation at Dreamforce 2019.

Good news: in this version I have unlimited time so I’ve shown all the steps in detail.

More good news: this presentation doesn’t actually utilize anything specific to nonprofits so it’s suitable for you Sales Cloud folks as well.

You’ll find a quick summary of the flow here.

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We’re Speaking at Dreamforce!

Critics who viewed our sessions at Forcelandia called them “Hilarious!” “Informative!” “The best!” If you’re coming to the big event, don’t miss out!

Flow Basics for Nonprofit Admins 

Wednesday, 12pm Westin St. Francis with Salesforce.org staff Jessie Rymph

jessie headshot

Flow is a powerful automation tool that walks users through screens, updates multiple objects at once, and reaches distantly related records all with clicks-not-code. By learning Flow, nonprofits can surpass the limitations of Process Builder and harness the power of code without actually having a developer on staff. In this session, we’ll demystify record variables, “get records”, and other elements that are often unfamiliar to non-coders. Participants will walk away with an understanding of the *why* behind each step in the flow creation process!

One Process to Rule Them All

Thursday, 11:30am Moscone West with MVP Maya Peterson

maya

One process to rule them all, one process to find them, one process to bring them all and in the invocation bind them. As a best practice Salesforce now recommends restricting your org to one record-change process per object. Truly a tool of great power. In this session you’ll learn tricks to manage process criteria nodes using Custom Metadata Types, Custom Settings, and Custom Permissions. No harrowing trip to Mount Doom required.

How to Include an Unsubscribe Link, Revised

Allow Recipients to Unsubscribe from All Emails

Follow this tutorial to include an unsubscribe link in promotional emails sent from Salesforce. This post gives you some reasons for considering this feature.

When the recipient clicks to unsubscribe, a flow will look for all contacts and leads who have this as their preferred email address (if you’re in NPSP) or in the Email field. All contacts or leads who meet that requirement will be marked “Email Opt Out.”  The email address owner will receive one confirmation email immediately.

Please try this in your sandbox or a Trailhead playground first! I cannot figure out how to test it in a developer edition! Continue reading →

Winter ’20 Flow Improvements & Disappointments

Oh man…so much good stuff in the new release. And a real bummer.

Add a lookup component in Flow

I’m really disappointed about this. I was confusing “lookup” with “search.” I want to search for any record I want and get a list returned. Nope. I can search using any lookup field I already have. This is good, but not quite what I was thinking.

RIP Bailey Bones, my beloved companion of 14 years.

Unsatisfying use case : A dog turned in at the animal shelter has a microchip number (text field) which I want to use to search for potentially matching dogs. I want to look up a dog in my flow then process their intake at the shelter.

  • Possible solution: I could do this if I had the microchip number in the name of animal, like Bailey 238392, and I looked it up to the animal record from say, an adoption record. It has to already be a lookup field.

Satisfying use case: Let’s say I am processing an animal record for adoption. From the animal’s record, I can lookup the Contact record of the person who is adopting the animal as part of my animal adoption flow.

Note: you can do a work around for this kind of search. Thanks Jenwlee.

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Was it worth my time to automate that? On the AppExchange!

Thanks to everyone who expressed an interest in my June 5, 2019 post “Was it worth my time to automate that?” The solution is now available on the AppExchange from Salesforce Labs! Check it out!

Have you ever wondered:

  • How much time am I saving with this automation?
  • How many times has this process ever fired?
  • Was the time I spent building this thing worth the investment?
  • Are the people who requested this automation actually using it? If not, who is?

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Intro to Flow at Forcelandia

At Forcelandia this year, I explained why we have to “get records” and why we use record variables with this analogy of ordering at a coffee shop with a robot.

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Was it worth my time to automate that?

UPDATE 9/9: Now on the AppExchange! Click here to see the listing.

UPDATE 6/13: Thank you everyone for your interest in this solution! I am working on adding it to the AppExchange through Salesforce labs!

At TrailheaDX I ran around like a bird for a video with Einstein and Astro. I also facilitated a lively Circle of Success (small group conversation) on Process Automation. Everyone shared their best practices, asked questions and learned from each other. The admins’ orgs ranged from a 10-free-licenses nonprofit to a giant health insurance company, and years of experience from 0 to 10 (not me! I’m at 8, I think).

One guy (and I’m so sorry I don’t have his name) asked:

“Is there any way to track how often your automation fires?”

That got us thinking. What if you could find out:

  • How much time am I saving with this automation?
  • How many times has this process ever fired?
  • Was the time I spent building this thing worth the investment?

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A Glorious NPSP Day Seattle

npspday

“Next step in our : The meta-peeps create some organized chaos: What’s unknown in @SalesforceOrg‘s NPSP, at .” Photo &Tweet from @BRCTweets (Barbara Christensen)

Both years I’ve attended NPSP we’ve had incredible weather so the idea of a unhandled sunshine error is not applicable to this magical day.

MOOD of the room: Excited, happy, energized, grateful to be part of this amazing supportive community.

KUDOS: Ryan Ozimek and Katie Fadden are delightful facilitators! Megan and everyone at 501 Commons pulled this off flawlessly the day after Give Big! Congrats to Crystal on the birth of her new baby girl! So much !!!

STRAIGHT TALK: In this segment of the programming, we brought the elephant to the center of the room and talked about the .org acquisition. As a .org employee, I just want to make it clear that the opinions below are those of other folks who attended, some of which I might share, but they by no means reflect any official stance of Salesforce:

  • We want .org or .com to say “IT’S GOING TO BE OKAY. YOU DON’T NEED TO WORRY.”

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Attach Meeting Notes on Events

 

Samantha C. asked in the Power of Us Hub: “Does anyone know if you can track meetings with salesforce? We are looking to track our meetings and add a few bullet points about those meetings so we can look back and see where something left off.” And I was curious how it could be done. Here’s the answer in Lightning. Continue reading →

Printable Donor Profile

Sometimes as a Salesforce admin I’ve been asked to do things which just seem ridiculously old school, not very efficient and may involve actual paper. When I cannot convince someone to click through a few screens, instead of printing or having an email sent to them, it gets my admin panties all in a bunch.  (Wouldn’t that be cool, to have actual admin panties?!)

Sexy Sys Admin Women's Boy Brief

Not actually surprised that these exist! Thanks Cafe Press Canada!

But when working with a nonprofit, you gotta just let it go. And that is how this printable donor profile came into being.

My pro bono client: The Cedar River Clinics, which are fantastic, independent reproductive & LGBTQ health clinics in Renton, Seattle, and Tacoma.

My task:  Create a one-page document with important donor information.  The development director will print the doc and hand it to the executive director to review before she calls a major donor.  Continue reading →